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Saturday Apr 19

History and Background of the Organization:

HEED Bangladesh (Health, Education and Economic Development) is a non-profit, non-political and non-governmental organization (NGO) committed to participate and promote national development through upgrading the socio-economic condition of the disadvantaged and underprivileged people in the society. The organization, as a national non-governmental organization (NGO), was formed in 1974, by national Christian leaders and several western partner organizations in response to the post war needs in Bangladesh. Since 1974, HEED Bangladesh has been working in the fields of health, education, agriculture, aquaculture, livestock, forestry, environment & natural resource management, bio-diversity conservation, disaster management, socio-economic development of marginalized and under privileged people, micro finance, nutrition & Hygiene education, water and sanitation, HIV/AIDS, rural development, awareness raising, arsenic, women, street children, etc.

ADD Staff strength

Ensure basic Health and Medicare services for the target (agreed) communities in need, within the specific operation locations, delivered through awareness rising, demand creation, institutional development, building of community capacity, linking with GO-NGO service delivery points.
Extend support to formal systems to promote quality primary education for children with special emphasis on girls, disabled and working children, and design and implement innovative occupational and functional education for adolescents and adults and expanding community education on health, nutrition, sanitation environment, rights and governance;
Counter poverty through creation of alternative income and employment opportunities, promotion of entrepreneurial initiatives and capital building, enhancement of occupational skills for production and values addition and extension of linkage and marketing supports enabling communities to take charge of their own socio-economic sustainability;
Build effective systems, mechanisms and facilities capacitating communities to respond to unforeseen needs and situations prior and during disasters (flood, cyclone, drought, fire, accidents, etc), provide basic information, supports and services for mitigation of sufferings and rehabilitation of life and living jointly with concerned stakeholders;

HEED Bangladesh has been attaching high priority on good governance, accountability and transparency, operating according to the approved constitution of the organization. It has got four types of organizational structures. These are 1) General Body, 2) Executive Board, 3) General Administration and 4) Advisory Committee.

General Body:
The General Body is ornamented by a group of highly qualified and experienced professionals and dignitaries of the society. The HEED-Bangladesh Society of 20 members sits at least once in a general meeting annually in a transparent and democratic manner all the way. The HEED-Bangladesh Society approves the program activities and budget, income & expenditure, formulates organizational policies, elects the Executive Board and approves membership.

Executive Body:
The Executive Board of 10 members is elected by the members of the General Body in a democratic process for 3 Years. It is the supreme authority to frame policies and guidelines to run the organization. This is the supreme policy-making body of the organization for preparing policies and conducts the entire official administrative and planning for projects and programs. Generally the EC meets at least twice in a year. If it is required, it sits more than twice to solve the emergency issues of the organization.


 

List of Executive Committee of the Organization:

Sl. No

Name & Address

Brief Introduction & Denomination

Position In The Board

01.

Rev. Sukamal Biswas

 

National Director- Church of Nazarene

Treasurer-National Chirstian Fellowship of Bangladesh

Vice-Chairman - Koiinonia

 

 

Chairman

02.

Rev. Robinson Mondol

 

Pastor

Sevenday Adventist Church

Gopalgonj, Dhaka.

 

Vice- Chairman

03.

 Rev. James Saberio Karmoker

General Secretary

National Christian Fellowship of Bangladesh

 

Treasurer

04.

Mrs. Vijayamala Chowdhuri

Director - Christian Discipleship Center

 

Member

05.

Mrs. Induprova Mondal

 

Member - Church of Bangladesh

Chairperson- “Britter Baire” a Women & Children Welfare Association

 

Member

06.

Mr. Barnad Tamal Mandal

Bogura Christian Church

Accountant - Bogura Christian Mission Hospital

 

Member

07

Anwar Hossain

Chairman -  Bangladesh Bible Society

Secretary/

Executive Director

Elected For the Tenure, 2013 - 2015

Election Date: 1st December, 2012

 



General Administration:
Executive Director (ED), the functional/ administrative head of the organization, is responsible for overall management and administration of HEED-Bangladesh as well development and implementation of its different programs/ projects and related activities along with his professional staff. ED is accountable to the Executive Board. Under the leadership of the Executive Director, a progressive management team of highly qualified people is engaged to handle all development activities of the organization.

Advisory Committee:
To realize the vision and mission of HEED-Bangladesh, four separate departments are engaged with specific roles and responsibilities. Each Department has an Advisory Committee of a minimum five members having relevant expertise.

Legal Frame-work:
HEED is allowed to offer its services to the target beneficiaries by the GOB. It is also providing its services to the target people as per the provision of the legally approved constitution. Details of legal frame-work of HEED Bangladesh are stated in this section.

Registration:
The organization has legal authority to operate its activities allover the country through registration with relevant government agencies under voluntary registration act. HEED is registered with the department of Social Welfare to take and execute social development activities in Bangladesh. It is also registered with NGO Affairs Bureau under foreign donation act of GoB to receive donation from external donor agencies.

Constitution:
It has been mentioned earlier that the constitution of HEED is formulated by the executive committee and adopted by the general members of HEED. The constitution of HEED is legally approved by the respective registration agencies of the Government of the Peoples Republic of Bangladesh.

Registration Authority, Number and Date:
Details of the registration authority, registration number and date of registration are mentioned in the following ta

SL

Number of Registration Authority

Registration Number

Year/Date of  Registration

01

Directorate of Social Services

SW/FDO/R-024

07/47/1980

02

Society’s act- XXI of 1860

S 555/15

26/01/76

03

NGO Affairs Bureau

FDR 024/81

24/47/1981

04

Directorate of Population Control and Family Planning

08

24/11/1978

 

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National Nutrition Program (NNP)

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Written by Administrator Thursday, 25 August 2011 08:23 Last Updated on Saturday, 27 August 2011 10:20

Background of NNP
The prevalence of malnutrition in Bangladesh is among the highest in the world, and is responsible for half of the deaths of children under 5 years of age. The risks and cost involved if no action taken is estimated at US$ 22.90 billion in ten years in relation to loss and productivity.

Though country has made some positive changes, the level of malnutrition in Bangladesh still remain the highest in the world, 58% of under five children are under weight and 51% are stunted: nearly 50% of women suffer from chronic energy deficit; low birth weight is incidence is estimated at 45% perhaps the highest in the world; and micronutrient deficiencies are rampant (over 70% of pregnant mothers are anemic).

The economic consequences of Bangladesh’s malnutrition problems are profound; resulting in lost productivity and reduced intellectual and learning capacity. In addition to causing individual tragedies like maternal and child death, malnutrition exacts heavy cost from the health care system through excess morbidity, increased premature delivery, and elevates risks of the heart diseases and diabetes. Women and children are vulnerable to it.

Bangladesh has achieved remarkable progress in human development over the last 25 years, with massive decline in mortality and fertility, and very large increase in life expectancy. But because of their progress, malnutrition now represents more than ever before; a major barrier to the achievement of the country’s economic and social goals. The current cost of the malnutrition has been estimated at US$ 1 billion annually.

The nutrition sector review examined progress since the last review in 1985-86, assessed the existing situation and country’s response to malnutrition, and considered whether, expanded on a national scale, it would be adequate to bring about significant decreases in the prevalence of malnutrition. The review suggested action and cost that would be required to meet identified gaps. A first generation of strategic goals has been achieved in Bangladesh, most of them since the last sector reviews. These include the generation of a high level of policy support, the development of an effective programmatic approach (the Bangladesh Integrated Nutritional Project, BINP), the evolution of nutrition promoting structures in the health and food policy arenas, and development policies which, even in the absence of the broad-based nutrition services, have generated some improvement in nutritional status among young children (by roughly 0.5 percentage points a year).
The prevalence of malnutrition in Bangladesh is among the highest in the world, and is responsible for half of the deaths of children under 5 years of age. The risks and cost involved if no action taken is estimated at US$ 22.90 billion in ten years in relation to loss and productivity.

Present Status of the Program
HEED Bangladesh has been implementing the National Nutrition Project (NNP) since 2003. At present HEED is implementing NNP program in six upazila of Sariartpur district.
This contract will continue up to October-09 under the HNPSP of the Bangladesh Government. The government is planning to extend this contract period further based on the NGO performance and Policy of Government. Around 900 staff members of our project are providing their best effort in achieving the overall objective of the program.

Under the HNPSP this program considered more target beneficiaries like adolescent boys, husband of newly wed women, lactating and pregnant women. Father & Mother-in-law of lactating, pregnant and newly wed women. The major changes of the program have come under supplementary feeding. Before coming under HNPSP, the project targeted the severe malnourished fewer than 2 children, relapse, and growth falter of less than 2 children, lactating mothers and pregnant women when the BMI is below 18.5. Now only the pregnant women will be brought under SF when their BMI is below 17 and in addition only severe malnourish and hard core poor under 2 children will come under SF.

Objective
During the time of Bangladesh independence the Nutrition objectives and goals were addressed insignificantly, the activities were not generally perceived as nutrition program elements. With considerable policy attention now government has focused nutrition as one of the major program. Now it is the time to start the second phase of the challenges in this area.

Although less desperate than two decades ago, household food security is among the worst in the world, particularly for the poorest 14% of the rural population, the ultra food deficit group. The problem is exacerbated by high rates of functional landlessness coupled with a severe shortage of non-agricultural employment in rural areas, and further aggravated by periodic natural disaster intractability. Central to this problem are the low status of women, their severe time constraints, and the absence of remunerated employment opportunities in rural areas, and the early age of marriage.

As in most of the low-income countries, reducing the prevalence of moderate malnutrition has been particularly difficult. Yet the largest promotions of young children who die of malnutrition-related causes are children with moderate rather than severe malnutrition.

NNP

HNPSP by 2010

  1. Reduction of severe PEM among <2y to 5%
  2. Reduce moderate PEM <2y to 30%
  3. Increase pregnancy weight gain to 9 kg or more in 50% of pregnant women
  4. Reduce the incidence of LBW to 30%
  5. Reduction of anemia among adolescent girls  and pregnant and lactating women by 1/3
  6. Sustain the prevalence of night blindness among  children aged 1 to <-5y to0.5%
  7. Reduce the prevalence of Iodine Deficiency Disorder (IDD) by 50%

  1. To reduce the prevalence of LBW (<2,500 g) from 36% to 20% or less
  2. To reduce the prevalence of underweight (WAZ <2 Z-scores) in children from 48% to 36%
  3. To reduce the prevalence of stunting ( HAZ <2 Z-scores) in children < 5 years from 43%  to 37%
  4. To reduce wasting ( WHZ<2 Z) in < 5 years from 13%  to 8%
  5. To maintain the prevalence of night blindness among  children aged 12-59 months below 0.5%
  6. Reduce the night blindness among  pregnant women below 5%
  7. To reduce the prevalence of anemia in <-5y children from 49% to 40%, Adolescents from 30% to 20%  and pregnant women from 46% to 30%
  8. To reduce the prevalence of Iodine Deficiency (UIE <100 ug L) from 43% to23% of all school aged (6-12 years) Children.
  9. Pregnancy wt gain more then 9 kg or more in  50% of pregnant women
  10. To increase house food consumption (egg- meat, vegetables, fruits etc) through homesteaded food production.

Half of the country’s population will be urban by the year 2011 and the prevalence of nutritional stunting in urban slum is nearly 80%. The absence of health infrastructure, the high turnover in population, and the frequent absence of family support network limit interventions.

Location of the Project & Number of staff


Name of District

Name of  Upazila

No of Union

No of P. sava

No of Village

No of wards

Total No of staff & Volunteers

UM

AC

FS

SS

MLSS

CNO

CNP

WGM

Sariotpur

Sariotpur Sadar

11

01

169

99

01

01

05

01

01

17

169

1,014

 

Naria

15

01

222

135

01

01

06

01

01

22

222

1,332

 

Zazira

12

01

164

108

01

01

04

01

01

16

164

948

 

Gosaerhat

7

01

120

63

01

01

03

01

01

12

120

720

 

Damuddia

7

01

85

63

01

01

03

01

01

10

85

510

 

Bhedergonj

13

01

177

177

01

01

06

01

01

21

177

1,062

Total

06

65

06

937

645

06

06

27

06

06

81

768

5586

Target Beneficiaries
During the year in our Upazilas we have covered 1195371 Population, 226778 household, 137427 beneficiaries through 937 Community Nutrition Center.


Name of  Upazila

Name of Population

No of Household

No of Beneficiaries

No of Total CNCs

Under 2 Children

Adolescent

Newlywed couples

Pregnant women

Lactating Mother

Sariotpur Sadar

195370

38223

8575

10474

1695

2008

114

169

Naria

250691

48401

6942

12694

1149

1965

177

222

Zazira

205915

38,453

8484

14799

917

1653

138

164

Gosaerhat

1,58635

29204

6505

10914

1059

1366

112

120

Damuddia

109285

22046

3732

7096

921

1114

103

85

Bhedergonj

275475

50451

9305

18181

1745

2570

320

177

Total

1195371

226778

43543

74758

7486

10676

964

937